This Week on The Credit Report with Bill Lewis


Interesting guests and timely topics will be on the air this week on AM 1470 WWNN and The Credit Report with Bill Lewis.

Broward Republican Party Treasurer Mark McCarthy will discuss Tea Party favorite Christine O’Donnell and her Thursday book signing on behalf of the party at the Coral Ridge Yacht Club in Fort Lauderdale.  O’Donnell may also appear to discuss her new book, “Troublemaker: Let’s Do What It Takes to Make America Great Again.”

Broward County Commissioner Chip LaMarca will appear and discuss how difficult it can be as the only Republican on a nine member commission.

Foreclosure defense attorney Carlos Reyes will discuss the latest developments in the “robo-signing” controversy and investigations started by the Florida Attorney General’s Office.

Broward Sheriff Al Lamberti will appear and discuss Back to School Safety and other initiatives of the largest fully accredited law enforcement agency in America.

Director Chuck Lanza of the Broward County Emergency Management Division will discuss hurricane safety and preparation in light of the Florida forecast cone for Hurricane Irene.

Republican Party of Broward County Executive Director Rico Petrocelli will appear and discuss Presidency 5 and initiatives to grow the local party.

Florida’s 34th Senator and current U.S. Senate candidate George LeMieux will discuss his candidacy in the Republican race to replace Democratic Senator Bill Nelson.

The Credit Report with Bill Lewis is a daily forum for business and financial news, politics, economic trends, and cutting edge issues.  Bill can be heard weekday’s at 9 o’clock on AM 1470 WWNN in south Florida or by streaming audio at www.wwnnradio.com.  Phone lines are open at (888) 565-1470. 

Foreclosure Fraud Case Settled at the Florida Supreme Court


In a matter of “great public importance” that has gone largely ignored this week, the high-profile foreclosure fraud case of Roman Pino versus The Bank of New York has been settled.  According to the Florida Supreme Court, the matter was dismissed upon Pino’s “Notice –Dismiss (Voluntary Stipulation)” on July 25th.

The opportunity for a precedent setting opinion for attorney Thomas Ice, of Ice Legal, whose boutique litigation firm specializes in uncovering forged and fraudulent foreclosure documents, must mean outright success for Pino. 

Although details of the settlement were not provided in the brief stipulation before the high court, one can only speculate whether Pino received a mortgage modification, principal reduction, right to short-sale, waiver of deficiency balance, or his home free and clear. 

One thing is clear, though.  Any settlement agreement between the parties would contain a confidentiality agreement.

Neither Ice, nor Enrique Nieves – Pino’s attorney of record – were available for comment despite several messages left at Ice Legal and on their cell phone voicemail.

An appeals court in February requested that the Florida Supreme Court consider the case of Greenacres homeowner Roman Pino as a matter of “great public importance.” The decision by the 4th District Court of Appeal in West Palm Beach was unusual as neither the bank nor the homeowner had requested such a review.

“We conclude that this is a question of great public importance, as many, many mortgage foreclosures appear tainted with suspect documents,” the appeals court wrote in certification to the Supreme Court.

Had the matter been adjudicated on its merits and a decision rendered in favor of Pino, thousands of foreclosure cases could have been impacted as allegations of document fraud and robo-signing run rampant throughout the nation.

According to land records, Pino purchased his Greenacres home in July, 2006 for $203,000 by securing a $162,400 mortgage with Silver State Financial Systems. After falling behind on the mortgage, the Bank of New York moved to foreclose in October, 2008.

In their foreclosure complaint, the Bank of New York alleged that it was the owner of Pino’s mortgage note through an assignment from another lender, but did not include said assignment as part of its original complaint.

Pino retained Ice, who in moving to dismiss the complaint, argued that the bank needed an assignment in order to have standing to foreclose.

Attorneys from the Law Offices of David J. Stern in Plantation filed an amended complaint and attached an unrecorded mortgage assignment “which happened to be dated just before the original pleading was filed,” the appeals court wrote.

Stern’s now defunct law firm is one of several foreclosure mills throughout Florida that are under investigation by Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi.

Just as Pino’s attorneys were set to take depositions of Stern employees to determine how the assignment was created, the Bank of New York dismissed its foreclosure action.  Ice had wanted an opportunity to prove that Pino was the victim of fraud but was unable to do so because of the voluntary dismissal. The bank refiled the foreclosure in August 2009, and that case is pending.

In its written opinion, the Fourth District Court of Appeal agreed with the lower court’s ruling about the dismissal but because of its importance on similar foreclosure matters, sent the case to the state’s highest court in Tallahassee. One appellate judge, Gary Farmer, dissented saying he thought the trial judge could have kept the case open to litigate Pino’s claim of fraud.

“I’m not surprised at a settlement of this matter considering the allegations of forged or fraudulent documents and the risk of substantial loss to the bank,” said Carlos J. Reyes, of the Reyes Law Group in Fort Lauderdale.  “As a foreclosure defense attorney, my preference would have been for a written opinion from the Florida Supreme Court, but the client is the ultimate decision maker in any settlement discussions.”

Foreclosure Defense: Dead Man Served with Foreclosure Papers


 

Foreclosure defense attorneys have long alleged that process servers occasionally file false affidavits in support of personal service in foreclosure matters.  Some homeowners are defending themselves stating that mortgage lenders did not serve them properly.

Contrary to the sworn affidavit of process server Robin Lucas-Peters on one local foreclosure case, the homeowner was not served at all.  Having died on August 4, 2010 “personal service” upon him on April 21, 2011 was simply not possible. 

“It’s equivalent to perjury,” said Andrew Dinnerstein, the Sunrise attorney representing the family of the deceased.  “The system is being abused to such an extent that people aren’t even being served properly.”

The homeowner has not been identified to protect the family’s privacy.

Foreclosure defense attorneys have documented a number of cases where process servers allegedly filed false affidavits.  While investigating the law firms that employed “robo-signers,” state investigators are closely examining the service of process in a number of cases.

The process server in this case said she attempted to serve the homeowner on five separate occasions.   On the fifth attempt, the person answering the door said he was the homeowner being sought and accepted the foreclosure papers.

Several recent foreclosure cases allege homeowners never received foreclosure papers even though they still occupied their home.  Others allege that process servers did not take the required steps to locate them or filed false affidavits about whom or when they delivered papers.   

This is the first reported case of a deceased homeowner being served with foreclosure papers.

Lucas-Peters filed a falsified document, swearing foreclosure papers were properly served when they were not, Dinnerstein said.

When a homeowner is deceased, the mortgage lender must request that the court assign an administrator and then serve foreclosure papers upon them.

Dinnerstein indicates that he will seek sanctions against the lender and ProVest, which is under investigation by the Florida Attorney General for allegations of false returns of service under oath and forged signatures of process servers.

In a number of unrelated foreclosure defense matters, some process servers allegedly violated rules related to the personal delivery of legal papers.  Like robo-signing foreclosure documents without reviewing them for accuracy, a number of homeowners are now alleging they were never served with foreclosure papers.

Once rare, “bad service” of process has become more common as lenders and their attorneys speed thousands of foreclosure cases through “rocket dockets” that are designed to clear an ever growing backlog.

“With the foreclosure debacle, it’s become more complicated,” says Carlos J. Reyes, a foreclosure defense attorney with the Reyes Law Group in Fort Lauderdale. “For the sake of expediency, process servers are being rushed. As they are paid by the piece, they have an interest in earning a higher income.”

Homeowners involved in foreclosures are required to receive a summons and complaint personally delivered by a process server. Repeated attempts at personal service are required before court permission can be obtained to publish a legal notice in the alternative.

In the case of a deceased homeowner, foreclosure papers are served upon an administrator. 

Some process servers have allegedly cut corners.  One recently claimed she could not find a homeowner facing foreclosure on a second home, despite conducting extensive record checks. This held true even though the foreclosure complaint clearly provided a primary home address in Connecticut.

Lenders and attorneys typically contract their summons delivery work to large process serving firms, who sub-contract to private independent servers. In her deposition to state investigators, former Stern paralegal Tammie Lou Kapusta, testified that summons serving procedures were a “complete mess,” with homeowners routinely complaining they never received papers.

She and another former employee, Kelly Scott, said their managers told them move forward with the foreclosures anyway.

Investigators also questioned staff at Stern’s firm regarding billing practices that involved serving multiple parties at an address and billing for each one.

“Good service of process is crucial”, Reyes said. He has heard of homeowners losing their home because they never received a summons and missed filing dates or court hearings.

While a court summons must be accepted by an adult, state law does not require it to be served upon the property owner. No one has to sign, verifying receipt, “which makes it easier to say the person was served, when they weren’t,” Reyes said.

Laws governing the service of process vary from state to state. In Florida, there is no statewide licensing or regulating body for process servers, and rules vary greatly among the 20 judicial circuits.

While ProVest declined to comment on specific cases, company president James Ward stated they “utilize properly licensed or authorized independent contractors” and require them to “fully comply with state and local guidelines.”

“ProVest is confident the vast majority of notifications are being conducted appropriately and where there are anomalies of inadequate service we strive to learn from those situations,” Ward said.

To learn more about the foreclosure crisis or to file a complaint with the Florida Attorney General, visit their website at http://www.myfloridalegal.com or call (866) 9-NO-SCAM (866-966-7226).

Fund to help hardest-hit Floridians


Are you unemployed or underemployed and unable to pay your mortgage on time? The Florida Housing Finance Corporation announced last week that Floridians having difficulties making their mortgage can apply for financial assistance from the Hardest-Hit Fund (HHF) beginning next Monday. On April 18 at 9 a.m., the program will become available to troubled homeowners in all 67 Florida counties.

“We’re now in the position to offer this financial assistance statewide to the people out there who are desperately struggling to stay in their homes,” said Steve Auger, executive director of Florida Housing. “For the homeowners who qualify, this temporary relief from their mortgage payments will provide some ‘breathing room’ so they can focus on becoming re-employed at a level that will allow them to resume making payments on their own.”

Following a pilot project in Lee County, and in consultation with Gov. Rick Scott’s office, some changes were made to the HHF program. For instance:

•The Unemployment Mortgage Assistance Program, or UMAP, will provide up to $12,000 to pay monthly mortgage and escrowed mortgage-related expenses for up to six months, or until the homeowner can resume making mortgage payments, whichever comes first. Homeowners in the UMAP will be required to pay 25 percent of their monthly income toward their mortgage payment, with a minimum payment of $70 per month.

•The Mortgage Loan Reinstatement Payment Program, or MLRP, will provide up to $6,000 to bring a homeowner’s past-due first mortgage current if they can demonstrate an ability to resume making payments on their own. For a homeowner who received funding under the UMAP program, any remaining funds can be used in addition to MLRP funds to bring a first mortgage current.

Minimum qualifications a homeowner must meet to be considered under either HHF program are unchanged. UMAP and MLRP program funds will be in the form of a 0 percent, deferred-payment loan; a loan that can be forgiven over a five-year period, at a rate of 20 percent each year.

“There are several reasons for these changes to the program,” said David Westcott, director of Homeownership Programs at Florida Housing. “Most importantly, the need for this program continues to grow and we want to assist as many homeowners as possible. These changes could allow Florida Housing to provide financial assistance to nearly 40,000 homeowners statewide-twice as many as we previously estimated could be helped,” he said.

First announced in February 2010, the “Housing Finance Agency Innovation Fund for the Hardest-Hit Housing Markets” provides federal funding to those states hardest hit by the real estate market collapse.

To date, $7.6 billion has been infused into the HFA Hardest-Hit Fund for 18 states and the District of Columbia. Florida’s total allocation currently stands at more than $1 billion.

Homeowners throughout Florida may apply for financial assistance from the fund by using the official HHF website: http://www.FLHardestHitHelp.org. The site contains information on the application process, including a program fact sheet, answers to frequently asked questions and links to resources that may be helpful to those experiencing challenges in tough economic times.

Floridians should be aware that several “imposter” or “copycat” websites posing as Hardest-Hit Fund sites have been identified.

Applicants are strongly encouraged to verify that the website they are using is, in fact, the official Florida HHF website before providing personal information. The Florida HHF application process is free-of-charge and applicants under the program are not asked to pay for an eligibility determination service in conjunction with applying for relief.

If applicants are suspicious about a website, they can submit an anonymous report on the official HHF website by clicking the “Report Fraud” link on the homepage. They can also call the Florida HHF Information Line at 1-877-863-5244 to ensure they are using the correct website address.

To review Bill Lewis’ entire consumer protection series, visit http://www.williamlewis.us.

William E. Lewis Jr. & Associates is a solutions based professional consulting firm specializing in the discriminating individual, business or governmental entity. To learn more, tune into The Credit Report with Bill Lewis, weekdays at 9 o’clock on AM 1470 WWNN.

Orininal source – The Credit Report with Bill Lewis, as printed in The Highlands Today, an edition of the Tampa Tribune.  http://www2.highlandstoday.com/content/2011/apr/10/fund-to-help-hardest-hit-floridians/news-newbusiness/

Foreclosure Mill Settles With Florida Attorney General


Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi announced today a first-of-its-kind settlement against attorney Marshall C. Watson and his law firm – the Law Offices of Marshall C. Watson – for alleged improprieties in the prosecution of foreclosure cases throughout Florida.  

This settlement calls for a $2 million payment and imposition of certain requirements to conduct business and is the first stemming from numerous investigations into Florida foreclosure law firms.

“We are aggressively investigating these law firms in order to protect the interests of everyone involved in foreclosure proceedings. Homeowners, lending institutions and the courts deserve to know that the law is being followed and all documentation is true and accurate,” stated Attorney General Pam Bondi. “Anything short of total assurance of complete accuracy during such serious situations is unacceptable.”

Florida led the nation in the investigation of law firms and foreclosure mills engaged in the improper production and filing of foreclosure documents. The Law Offices of Marshall C. Watson fully cooperated with the investigation since its inception.

Half of the $2 million payment from Marshall Watson’s law firm to the Attorney General’s Office will be contributed to the Florida Bar Foundation to continue the Florida Attorney General Mortgage Foreclosure Grant Program. This grant program provides for the funding of Legal Aid attorney positions throughout Florida specifically devoted to the representation of low-income individuals facing foreclosure actions.

The investigation of the Florida Attorney General into the practices of several other Florida law firms is continuing.

To access the Assurance of Voluntary Compliance, please click here: http://myfloridalegal.com/webfiles.nsf/WF/SKNS-8FAHED/$file/WatsonAVC.pdf

Court’s stance on foreclosure case could have big impact


A Palm Beach county homeowner fighting alleged foreclosure fraud has ended up before the Florida Supreme Court.

An appeals court last week requested that the high court consider the case of Greenacres homeowner Roman Pino as a matter of “great public importance.” The decision by the 4th District Court of Appeal in West Palm Beach was unusual as neither the bank nor the homeowner requested such a review.

“We conclude that this is a question of great public importance, as many, many mortgage foreclosures appear tainted with suspect documents,” the appeals court wrote in certification to the Supreme Court.

Should the case be accepted by the Florida Supreme Court and a decision rendered in favor of Pino, thousands of cases could be impacted as allegations of document fraud run rampant throughout the state.

According to land records, Pino purchased his Greenacres home in July, 2006 for $203,000 by securing a $162,400 mortgage with Silver State Financial Systems. After falling behind on the mortgage, the Bank of New York moved to foreclose in October, 2008.

In their foreclosure complaint, the Bank of New York alleged that it was the owner of Pino’s mortgage note through an assignment from another lender, but did not include said assignment as part of its original complaint.

Pino retained Thomas Ice, of Ice Legal, whose boutique litigation firm specializes in uncovering forged and fraudulent foreclosure documents. In moving to dismiss the complaint, Pino’s attorney argued that the bank needed an assignment in order to have standing to foreclose.

Attorneys from the law offices of David J. Stern in Plantation filed an amended complaint and attached an unrecorded mortgage assignment “which happened to be dated just before the original pleading was filed,” the appeals court wrote.

Stern’s firm is one of four foreclosure mills under investigation by Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi. In addition to Stern, the Florida Default Law Group, the Law Offices of Marshall C. Watson, P.A. and Shapiro & Fishman, LLP, have all denied wrong doing.

Just as Pino’s attorneys were set to take depositions of Stern employees to determine how the assignment was created, the bank dismissed its foreclosure action. Ice had wanted an opportunity to prove that Pino was the victim of fraud but was unable to do so because of the voluntary dismissal. The bank refiled the foreclosure in August 2009, and that case is pending.

In its written opinion, the Fourth District Court of Appeal agreed with the lower court’s ruling about the dismissal but because of its importance on similar foreclosure matters, sent the case to the state’s highest court in Tallahassee. One appellate judge, Gary Farmer, dissented saying he thought the trial judge could have kept the case open to litigate Pino’s claim of fraud.

“In recognizing the procedural issue at hand, the District Court of Appeal is inherently signaling that forged or fraudulent documents have been introduced into foreclosure cases,” says Carlos J. Reyes, a foreclosure defense attorney with the Reyes Law Group in Fort Lauderdale. “The Pino case illustrates an issue where banks have dismissed foreclosures when problematic documents have been discovered only to be refiled later with different documents.”

To learn more about the mortgage foreclosure crisis or to file a complaint with the Attorney General’s Office, please visit www.myfloridalegal.com or call (866) 9-NO-SCAM (866-966-7226).

To review Bill Lewis’ entire consumer protection series, visit http://www.williamlewis.us.

William E. Lewis Jr. & Associates is a solutions based professional consulting firm specializing in the discriminating individual, business or governmental entity. To learn more, tune into The Credit Report with Bill Lewis, weekdays at 9 o’clock on AM 1470 WWNN.

The Credit Report with Bill Lewis, as reported in the Highlands Today, a Media General Group publication: http://www2.highlandstoday.com/content/2011/feb/06/courts-stance-on-foreclosure-case-could-have-big-i/

Florida Attorney General cracking down on foreclosure mills


Homeowners, attorneys, and Florida’s judiciary have long sounded the alarm over insufficient or fraudulent documents being used to take thousands of properties from unsuspecting homeowners in the foreclosure process. Not only has the Florida Supreme Court amended the rules of civil procedure in relation to home foreclosures, judges throughout the state have reversed foreclosure sales, dismissed cases for insufficiency, and created additional steps to ensure the proper filing and disposition of cases.

 

Coming on the heels of an investigation into the Florida Default Law Group, Florida Attorney General Bill McCollum announced Tuesday that his office has launched a new investigation into allegations of unfair and deceptive actions by three law firms handling residential foreclosure cases in the Sunshine State.

Handling over 35 percent of all foreclosure cases in the state of Florida, the investigation names the Law Offices of Marshall C. Watson, P.A.; the Law Offices of David J. Stern, P.A.; and Shapiro & Fishman, LLP. The Florida based law firms were hired by loan servicers to begin foreclosure proceedings when consumers were in default on their mortgages.

The Attorney General’s Economic Crimes Division is investigating whether documentation may have been fictitiously created and filed with Florida courts to speed up foreclosure processes, potentially without the knowledge or consent of the homeowners involved. Thousands of final judgments of foreclosure against Florida homeowners may have been the result of the alleged improper actions of the law firms under investigation.

Because many mortgages have been bought and sold by different institutions multiple times, key paperwork involved in the process to obtain foreclosure judgments is often missing. On numerous occasions, fabricated documents have allegedly been presented to courts in support of a final judgment against homeowners. The investigation will focus on whether these law firms created and filed improper documentation with Florida courts in an effort to deceptively strip Floridian’s of their homes.

The attorney general’s investigation will also look at whether the law firms created affiliated companies outside the United States where the alleged false documents are being prepared and then submitted to the law firms for use within the Florida court system.

“On numerous occasions, allegedly fabricated documents have been presented to the courts in foreclosure actions to obtain final judgments against homeowners,” stated Attorney General Bill McCollum. “As Attorney General, my job is to protect the rights of all Floridian’s by investigating unlawful activities and putting a stop to deceptive practices. To this end, my office will continue to investigate.”

News of the Florida Default Law Group investigation led to a number of complaints from homeowners and attorneys about the Law Offices of Marshall C. Watson, P.A.; the Law Offices of David J. Stern, P.A.; and Shapiro & Fishman, LLP. Subpoenas were served on each of the law firms demanding documents dating back to Jan. 1, 2008. The subpoenas also seek information on 18 specific foreclosure cases, in addition to general information about the law firms’ operations.

Defense attorneys who have long reported widespread fraud in home foreclosure cases called Tuesday’s announcement from the state’s chief law enforcement officer a “bombshell” for Florida’s foreclosure system.  “The fact that Bill McCollum is expanding his investigation into potentially unfair and deceptive practices should be commended” said Fort Lauderdale foreclosure defense attorney Scott Kleiman of Kalis & Kleiman. “The attorney general doesn’t spend limited state resources investigating these types of cases without reason.”

According to McCollum, 245 complaints have been filed against the Florida Default Law Group while 48 complaints have been filed against The Law Offices of David Stern. The Law Offices of Marshall C. Watson and Shapiro & Fishman each have 12 complaints pending. A number of other complaints are under review and additional subpoenas may be issued.

If you are the victim of a mortgage foreclosure fraud, file a complaint with the Attorney General’s Office by calling (866) 9-NO-SCAM (866-966-7226) or by visiting their website at http://www.myfloridalegal.com.

William E. Lewis Jr., is a credit repair expert with Credit Restoration Consultants and host of “The Credit Report with Bill Lewis” on AM 1470 WWNN, a daily forum for business and financial news, politics, economic trends, and cutting edge issues.

Foreclosure defense: Court rules bank must prove ownership


Following foreclosure moratoriums by PNC Bank, Bank of America, J.P. Morgan Chase, and Ally Financial, the settlement of deceptive marketing charges by Wells Fargo Bank, and the Attorney General’s investigation into faulty foreclosure practices at the Florida Default Law Group, the Law Offices of Marshall C. Watson, P.A.; the Law Offices of David J. Stern, P.A.; and Shapiro & Fishman, LLP., a Florida court ruled that banks must provide evidence of ownership when attempting to foreclose on a property.

On Wednesday, a three-judge panel of the 4th District Court of Appeal in West Palm Beach overturned an earlier summary judgment by Palm Beach Circuit Court Judge Thomas Barkdull, allowing repossession of a Boca Raton couple’s home by US Bank National Association. The foreclosure went through even though the lender did not provide an original note or other acceptable proof of ownership.

In the case of Guiseppe Servedio, the court ruled that banks must provide evidence they actually own and hold the mortgage when seeking to foreclose on a property. “Some judges have been lax about the rules of evidence,” stated Peter Snyder, his attorney. “I think that what this case says is you better have the original note.”

The decision comes following an earlier ruling against Deutsche Bank where the court stated that “[a] summary judgment should not be granted where there are issues of fact raised by [the] affirmative defense[s] which have not been effectively factually challenged and refuted.” In this matter, a homeowner asserted several defenses that were ignored by Deutsche Bank and the lower court.

The recent decisions come amid critical reports of judicial foreclosures receiving “rocket docket” processing despite missing and/or poorly prepared documents. Last week, Wells Fargo admitted making mistakes in 55,000 foreclosure cases but promised to expeditiously address them.

The San Francisco-based bank said it plans to resubmit documents in Florida and 22 other states by mid-November. This move comes two weeks after Wells Fargo officials issued a statement saying its affidavit procedures and daily auditing “demonstrate our foreclosure affidavits are accurate.”

Officials at Wells Fargo claim the mistakes were technical and that it had no plans to halt the foreclosure process as PNC Bank, Bank of America, J.P. Morgan Chase, and Ally Financial did. “We don’t believe that there are instances in which the foreclosures would not have occurred otherwise,” says Teri Schrettenbrunner, a bank spokeswoman.

Through the Mortgage Foreclosure Multi State Group, attorneys general in all 50 states are investigating whether legal procedures and documents were handled properly in judicial foreclosures. As the probe widens, a number of attorneys general have opened separate investigations on “robo-signers” as well as law firms and banks.

Shapiro & Fishman, LLP, one of the four Florida foreclosure firms being investigated by the Florida attorney general for allegedly providing inaccurate or false documents, represented US Bank against the Servedio’s. Lawyers at the firm could not be reached for comment, but in the past have denied any wrongdoing.

In the appellate opinion, the judges said that even though US Bank later provided the court with a copy of the original note, it was insufficient because it was submitted after Barkdull finalized the foreclosure. “Without evidence demonstrating [the bank’s] status as holder and owner of the note, genuine issues of material fact remain,” the judges wrote.

“Unfortunately, for the sake of expediency and reduction of overloaded dockets, judges are granting summary judgments without full consideration of a homeowners affirmative defenses and the evidence presented,” says Carlos J. Reyes, a foreclosure defense attorney with the Reyes Law Group in Fort Lauderdale. “In some cases, the appellate courts have now found that banks did not provide a note or prove ownership of the property being foreclosed upon.”

Source:  The Credit Report with Bill Lewis – Highlands Today, an edition of the Tampa Tribune (Media General Group) – http://www2.highlandstoday.com/content/2010/oct/31/foreclosure-defense-court-rules-bank-must-prove-ow/news-newbusiness/ To review Bill Lewis’ entire consumer protection series at the Highlands Today, visit www.williamlewis.us.

William E. Lewis Jr., is a credit repair expert with Credit Restoration Consultants and host of “The Credit Report with Bill Lewis” on AM 1470 WWNN, a daily forum for business and financial news, politics, economic trends, and cutting edge issues.

Mortgage and Foreclosure – Florida AG joins Mortgage Foreclosure Multi State Group


Attorney General Bill McCollum announced last week an ongoing effort to rein in mortgage servicers and protect Floridians from purported deceptive and unfair practices. Along with 49 other attorneys general who are part of the Mortgage Foreclosure Multi State Group, McCollum is leading an effort to stop mortgage loan servicers from submitting alleged false affidavits in support of mortgage foreclosure actions.

Homeowners, attorneys and investigators have long alleged that many of the affidavits contained within mortgage foreclosure complaints have been signed without personal knowledge of the facts asserted within them. Having recently come to light is the fact that many of affidavits were signed outside of the presence of a notary public. This process of signing documents without confirming their accuracy has come to be known as “robo-signing” and is in direct violation of Florida law.

In an effort to effectively address and investigate the robo-signing crisis, the Mortgage Foreclosure Multi State Group is now comprised of all 50 state Attorneys General, mortgage regulators and state banks. Led by Iowa Attorney General Tom Miller, plans are being made to speak with all relevant mortgage servicers to determine whether they have properly submitted affidavits or signed notices in support of foreclosure actions.

State banks and mortgage regulators are participating both individually and through their Multistate Mortgage Committee, which represents mortgage regulators from all 50 states. As a member of the Executive Committee, Florida has taken a leading role in this multistate initiative. The Executive Committee is also comprised of Attorneys General from Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Illinois, Iowa, North Carolina, Ohio, Texas, and Washington; and state banking regulators from the Maryland Office of the Commissioner of Financial Regulation and the New York State Banking Department.

McCollum previously initiated an investigation of the Florida Default Law Group, the Law Offices of Marshall C. Watson, P.A.; the Law Offices of David J. Stern, P.A.; and Shapiro & Fishman, accusing the four firms of faulty foreclosure practices. Those firms are fighting back, with one of the legal showdowns taking place last week in Broward County, where lawyers for David J. Stern presented a motion to “quash” the state’s subpoena.

Ruling for the attorney general in his efforts to subpoena the foreclosure records of Stern’s law firm, Broward County Circuit Court Judge Eileen O’Connor denied the Plantation attorney’s motion to quash McCollum’s subpoena.

O’Connor’s ruling was in stark contrast to an earlier ruling in Palm Beach County, where a judge told McCollum’s lawyers they could not subpoena the records of Tampa-based foreclosure firm Shapiro & Fishman.

Stern’s attorney said he would appeal the case to the 4th District Court of Appeal, meaning the difference between the two cases may become an issue at the appellate level. “We respectfully disagree with the judge’s ruling and plan to file an appeal,” said attorney Jeffrey Tew, who represents Stern.

While O’Connor did not provide a reason for her ruling, Palm Beach County Circuit Court Judge Jack Cox stated that “only the Supreme Court controls the conduct of lawyers in the courtroom and in court proceedings,” and that the attorney general did not have a right to subpoena the records.

Meanwhile, Stern’s support company, the publicly traded DJSP Enterprises, confirmed that it was cutting back 10 percent of its workforce. DJSP had grown to about 1,100 employees during the height of the foreclosure crisis. Lawyers from Greenberg Traurig were also retained to mount an internal investigation into allegations that its employees helped fabricate court documents in foreclosure cases.

If you would like to learn more about the mortgage foreclosure crisis or to file a complaint with the Attorney General’s Office, visit their website at www.myfloridalegal.com or call (866) 9-NO-SCAM (866-966-7226).

Source:  The Credit Report with Bill Lewis – Highlands Today, an edition of the Tampa Tribune (Media General Group) – http://www2.highlandstoday.com/content/2010/oct/17/florida-ag-joins-mortgage-foreclosure-multi-state-/  To review Bill Lewis’ entire consumer protection series, please visit http://www.williamlewis.us

William E. Lewis Jr., is a credit repair expert with Credit Restoration Consultants and host of “The Credit Report with Bill Lewis” on AM 1470 WWNN, a daily forum for business and financial news, politics, economic trends, and cutting edge issues.

Foreclosure defense: Process servers allegedly filing false affidavits


Recent reports indicate that approximately 462,339 foreclosure cases were pending in Florida as of June 30.

Following foreclosure moratoriums by Ally Financial, Bank of America, J.P. Morgan Chase, and PNC Bank, the settlement of deceptive marketing charges by Wells Fargo, and the Attorney General’s investigation into faulty foreclosure practices at the Florida Default Law Group, the Law Offices of David J. Stern, P.A.; the Law Offices of Marshall C. Watson, P.A.; and Shapiro & Fishman, LLP, investigators have turned up a new problem.

Process servers are now alleged to have filed false affidavits in support of personal service in foreclosure matters.

Foreclosure defense attorneys claim to have documented a number of cases where process servers filed false affidavits. While investigating the law firms that employed “robo-signers,” state investigators are also closely examining service of process in a number of cases.

Recent foreclosure defense cases allege homeowners never received a court summons even though they still occupied their home, while others allege that process servers did not take the required steps to locate them or filed false affidavits about whom or when they delivered papers.

According to the lawsuits, some process servers violated rules related to the personal delivery of legal papers. Like robo-signing foreclosure documents without reviewing them for accuracy, a number of homeowners are now alleging they were never served with foreclosure papers.

Once rare, “bad service” of process has become more common as lenders and their attorneys speed thousands of foreclosure cases through “rocket dockets” that are designed to clear an ever growing backlog.

“With the foreclosure debacle, it’s become more complicated,” says Carlos J. Reyes, a foreclosure defense attorney with the Reyes Law Group in Fort Lauderdale. “For the sake of expediency, process servers are being rushed. As they are paid by the piece, they have an interest in earning a higher income.”

Homeowners involved in foreclosures are required to receive a summons and complaint personally delivered by a process server. Repeated attempts at personal service are required before court permission can be obtained to publish a legal notice in the alternative.

Some process servers have allegedly cut corners. One recently claimed she could not find a homeowner facing foreclosure on a second home, despite conducting extensive record checks. This held true even though the foreclosure complaint clearly provided a primary home address in Connecticut.

Lenders and attorneys typically contract their summons delivery work to large process serving firms, who sub-contract to private independent servers. In her deposition to state investigators, former Stern paralegal Tammie Lou Kapusta, testified that summons serving procedures were a “complete mess,” with homeowners routinely complaining they never received papers.

She and another former employee, Kelly Scott, said their managers told them move forward with the foreclosures anyway.

Investigators also questioned staff at Stern’s firm regarding billing practices that involved serving multiple parties at an address and billing for each one.

“Good service of process is crucial”, Reyes said. He has heard of homeowners losing their home because they never received a summons and missed filing dates or court hearings.

While a court summons must be accepted by an adult, state law does not require it to be served upon the property owner. No one has to sign, verifying receipt, “which makes it easier to say the person was served, when they weren’t,” Reyes said.

Laws governing the service of process vary from state to state. In Florida, there is no statewide licensing or regulating body for process servers, and rules vary greatly among the 20 judicial circuits.

Among the largest with operations in ten states is Tampa-based ProVest. Although ownership interest by the law firms has been denied, they maintain support staff at the Law Offices of David J. Stern and Shapiro & Fishman in Boca Raton. Marshall C. Watson also uses ProVest.

While ProVest declined to comment on specific cases, company president James Ward stated they “utilize properly licensed or authorized independent contractors” and require them to “fully comply with state and local guidelines.”

To learn more about the mortgage foreclosure crisis or to file a complaint with the Attorney General’s Office, visit their website at www.myfloridalegal.com or call (866) 9-NO-SCAM (866-966-7226).

Source:  The Credit Report with Bill Lewis – Highlands Today, an edition of the Tampa Tribune (Media General Group) – http://www2.highlandstoday.com/content/2010/nov/07/foreclosure-defense-process-servers-allegedly-fili/ To review Bill Lewis’ entire consumer protection series at the Highlands Today, visit www.williamlewis.us.

William E. Lewis Jr., is a credit repair expert with Credit Restoration Consultants and host of “The Credit Report with Bill Lewis” on AM 1470 WWNN, a daily forum for business and financial news, politics, economic trends, and cutting edge issues.